16 foods from around the world that you would definitely qualify as weird!

Food lovers definitely want to try out food from across the world, and enjoy the delicacies from different cuisines. However, almost every cuisine in the world has a dish most of us would find weird. So, you think you can taste anything and everything that the world has to offer in terms of food dishes? You might want to hold on to that “Yes” and by the end of this article, you will surely reconsider your position. Without further ado, let’s check out this list of the most weird foods from around the world.

 

Shirako, Japan

The word Shirako literally translates to “white children” in Japanese. The dish includes sperm sacs from different fish species, which could be either of cod, puffer or angler fish. What may look like mini-sized brains of small animals, it actually tastes quite yummy and can be compared to a sweet custard.

 

 

Tuna eyeballs, Japan

Tuna fishes are a huge hit in Japanese culture. So much, so that even the eyeballs of these popular fishes are sold in supermarkets! You can get some for yourself, and after boiling them, you can season them with soy sauce and some garlic and you are good to go! Quite expectedly, they taste like squids.

 

 

Balut, the Philippines

Balut is a fertilized duck egg, which has an embryo that is partially developed. This fertilized egg is boiled and then enjoyed straight out of the shell – by adding some salt, pepper, and vinegar. The right way to eat this weird, but tasty food is to tap into the top portion of the egg, relish the liquid part and then chew the developed embryo with its feathers and bones attached! Ugh.

 

 

Crispy tarantulas, Cambodia

I don’t think any sane person other than Cambodians would think of food as the first thought that came to their mind on hearing the word tarantula. First eaten during the infamous Khmer Rouge regime when the people were starving of hunger, this food has gone on to become quite popular as a snack and is served all throughout the nation! This deep-fried, weird food apparently tastes like crab meat.

 

 

White ant eggs soup, Laos

Quite an unusual choice of soup, Gaeng Kai Mot Daeng includes a combination of white ants’ eggs and partially developed embryo as its main ingredients. To top it off, baby ants are added to the soup as well. Well, if you think you can taste this soup, it is apparently quite delicious and tastes a bit like shrimp with its sharp taste.

 

 

Jellied moose nose, Canada

The nose piece isn’t exactly what you’ll call a choice piece, but the Canadians beg to differ with the rest of us on this one! The right way to prepare the dish is to boil it up by adding onions and garlic and then removing hair from the nose. It is then boiled all over again and sliced into pieces where a thick and consistent broth is added, which makes it into a sort of jelly. We definitely have no choice but to agree with you if you’re thinking that this probably tastes as yucky as looks!

 

 

Boshintang, Korea

Known for its health benefits in the Korean culture, this soup is devoured by older generation Koreans and it hardly seems to find a place in the new Korean restaurants. The soup contains some spring onions, a bunch of dandelions, Korean spices, and one weird ingredient – the meat of a dog! Yes, you read that right. Although the younger generation of Koreans has moved past this (weird) dish, the elders continue to still relish it!

 

 

Huitlacoche, Mexico

Mexico is home to some of the most popular street food that we enjoy today all over the world. However, Mexico is also home to this weird kind of food. What will you do if corn kernels get attacked by a fungus that slowly turns it into blur or black spores? You would most probably throw it away unless you’re a Mexican. Mexicans use this corn-smut fungus that makes the kernels into black spores, which are enjoyed by people all year round and is known by the name of huitlacoche, which literally means “sleeping excrement”!

 

 

Airag, Mongolia

Would you like a bowl of fermented horse milk? Most people would be ready to punch the guy asking this question. Not our beloved Mongolians, though. Apparently, a mare’s milk that is allowed to ferment over time turns it into a nice beer called Airag, which is then enjoyed by most people in the country. This drink is served in a small bowl. Care to drink a glass of this drink, anyone?

 

 

Casu marzu, Italy

Known popularly as “rotten cheese” around the world, and as casu marzu in Italy, it is made with Pecorino that turned bad long, long ago! To prepare this cheese, cheese flies’ larvae are thrown in a bowl of Pecorino, which then hatch inside and eat up most of the fat. The final dish is a delicacy that is enjoyed by Italians and you can, too – with the maggots or without it, your choice. Phew!

 

 

Muktuk, Greenland

A traditional food dish made out of whale blubber and frozen skin, Muktuk is sometimes served raw and at other times, as a pickle. It consists of several layers, which are too hard to chew – the outer skin, which is apparently similar to hazelnuts, followed by the protective layer and the fat layer that are chewy. We strongly recommend this to only those who don’t wear a denture!

 

 

Hakarl, Iceland

How this came into existence is as weird as the dish itself. To prepare this dish, you first need to take out the gut of a Greenland shark and then put it in a kind of grave and then cover it with pebbles and sand. It is then left for around three months before it is cut into slices and again left for a few months to dry out. The end result is served and it is quite difficult for first-timers, we must admit. It was not a good experience, beware!

 

 

Century egg, China

What do you do if you find a rotten egg in your refrigerator? We can safely put a bet on you throwing it away in the trash. Not in China, though! Someone some centuries ago found this rotten egg, ate it and then lived long enough to tell this tale to others around them. Cut to the modern day – it is a delicacy that is a huge hit amongst the Chinese! The eggs (called hundred-year eggs) are stored by covering in a mixture of some clay, a bit of ash and some salt and then left for months before they are finally eaten. The end product is green with the smell of Sulphur!

 

 

Salo, Ukraine

The world of food lovers is divided on whether to keep the fat on top of meat or remove it. The people of Ukraine are on a very different level with this – they eat the fat only and leave out the meat! The most usual method to prepare it is to cut it into slabs of fat and then smoke it, before leaving it into a cellar for around a year or so. When it is ready, it is cut into thin slices and served along with bread. The Ukrainians are apparently crazy about this food so much that they even celebrate a festival dedicated to this dish! Woah, that’s some commitment, I must say!

 

 

Stargazy Pie, England

English cuisine isn’t known for some fancy stuff and most of it is pretty straightforward. Not with Stargazy Pie, though! A pie with fishes all around that seem like they’re looking at the heavens, this pie has its origins in the Mousehole village in England, which is traditionally served on the 23rd of December (Tom Bawcock’s Eve). According to the local legends, there was this sailor who sailed out one stormy night and came back with a large catch that would feed every starving mouth in the village!

 

 

Locusts, Israel

Perhaps the yuckiest of all, this dish deserves the first spot on this list for sure! Israel was suffering one of the worst locusts’ plague. But since this insect is considered as Kosher according to their faith, they decided to get rid of this issue with their own unique take – they started eating them! Eww. Apparently, chocolate-covered, deep-fried locusts are a craze in the Israel now.

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